You don’t believe in climate change do you?

Our Programme Manager tries not to offend you whilst urging action on climate change (and smoking).

How is it possible that almost all smokers understand that smoking increases their chance of dying of cancer but they continue to smoke?

Stupid aren’t they?

Maybe, but most of them just don’t believe it will happen to them. They don’t really believe that they will get cancer. Someone else will.

In this sense, I don’t really believe in climate change and I doubt whether you do too.

Shocking? Untrue? Possibly. Apologies if you’re offended.

But if you and I really believed that the things we are doing are causing the climate to change, why would you continue doing them?

Long haul flights for work and holidays, the latest iPhone, three TV’s in the house and two cars outside. I could go on.

We don’t really believe that all this consumption is causing damage to the environment and we certainly don’t understand that already it is causing huge disruption to people in the poorest countries in the world.

Today, the UN will meet in Paris to agree a new climate deal and, hopefully, to limit the impact of a growing world population (and with it growing consumption) on the global ecosystem.

There is hope at the UN level but we need to do something too.

First, and easiest, we should make our voices heard to our governments. We should demand that they prioritise the climate change in their policies and budgets. 

There are ‘Global Climate Marches’ all over the world on 29th November and probably one near you – check out your nearest one here: 

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/event/globalclimatemarch

In Bristol, we already have over 775 people signed up to join the march – why don’t you become number 776?

The second action is more difficult. It’s the action of us, personally, holding back on our exponentially increasing ‘standard of living’ in order to benefit the rest of the planet.

As Ghandi once said: “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” But, with respect, words are cheap and action more painful. 

But which holds the greater pain, not having a new iPhone 6, or the uncertain future of humanity and the planet?

"I forgot to ask - do you smoke?"